Which Way is Up?
NASA/JPL/University of Arizona
Which Way is Up?
ESP_035969_1825  Science Theme: 
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This image shows an impact crater that was cut by lava in the Elysium Planitia region of Mars. The relatively flat, shallow floor, rough surface texture, and possible cooling cracks seem to indicate that the crater was partially filled with lava. The northern part of the image also shows a more extensive lava flow deposit that surrounds the impact ejecta of the largest impact crater in the image.

Which way did the lava flow? It might appear that the lava flowed from the north through the channel into the partially filled crater. However, if you look at the anaglyph with your red and blue 3D glasses, it becomes clear that the partially filled crater sits on top of the large crater's ejecta blanket, making it higher than the lava flow to the north. Since lava does not flow uphill, that means the explanation isn't so simple.

We have seen much evidence for lava flows in this region that flowed to much higher levels than the present surface, then deflated or drained away. That may have happened here: lava flowed from from north to south to fill this crater, but then it drained back to the north, carving this channel.

The topographic information that we gained from having a stereo pair let us answer a question that we could not have with only a single image. This is a great example of why we take stereo images, where the two images are used to make a 3D image.

Written by: HiRISE Targeting Specialists  (29 October 2014)

This is a stereo pair with ESP_025631_1825.
 
Acquisition date
30 March 2014

Local Mars time
15:22

Latitude (centered)
2.347°

Longitude (East)
156.789°

Spacecraft altitude
272.2 km (169.1 miles)

Original image scale range
27.4 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects ~82 cm across are resolved

Map projected scale
25 cm/pixel and North is up

Map projection
Equirectangular

Emission angle
5.8°

Phase angle
58.2°

Solar incidence angle
53°, with the Sun about 37° above the horizon

Solar longitude
109.3°, Northern Summer

For non-map projected images
North azimuth:  97°
Sub-solar azimuth:  34.6°
JPEG
Black and white
map projected  non-map

IRB color
map projected  non-map

Merged IRB
map projected

Merged RGB
map projected

RGB color
non-map projected

JP2
Black and white
map-projected   (989MB)

IRB color
map-projected   (550MB)

JP2 EXTRAS
Black and white
map-projected  (518MB)
non-map           (528MB)

IRB color
map projected  (197MB)
non-map           (439MB)

Merged IRB
map projected  (226MB)

Merged RGB
map-projected  (218MB)

RGB color
non map           (423MB)
ANAGLYPHS
Map-projected, reduced-resolution
Full resolution JP2 download
Anaglyph details page

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
B&W label
Color label
Merged IRB label
Merged RGB label
EDR products
HiView

NB
IRB: infrared-red-blue
RGB: red-green-blue
About color products (PDF)

Black & white is 5 km across; enhanced color about 1 km
For scale, use JPEG/JP2 black & white map-projected images

USAGE POLICY
All of the images produced by HiRISE and accessible on this site are within the public domain: there are no restrictions on their usage by anyone in the public, including news or science organizations. We do ask for a credit line where possible:
NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

POSTSCRIPT
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif., manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The HiRISE camera was built by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corporation and is operated by the University of Arizona.