Stereo Anaglyphs of River Meanders in Eberswalde Delta
NASA/JPL/University of Arizona
Stereo Anaglyphs of River Meanders in Eberswalde Delta
PSP_001534_1560  Science Theme: Sedimentary/Layering Processes
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Eberswalde Delta contains river meanders, which indicate that flowing water was present for an extended period of time, not just the weeks required to explain the catastrophic flood channels.

Available here are two red-blue color anaglyphs in which you can view the topography with red-blue glasses (blue filter over your right eye). The first of these anaglyphs shows a relatively large area but with 3x reduction of spatial scale (75 cm/pixel), and the second is a sample at full resolution.

The former river channels are high rather than low, which is called inverted relief. Coarse gravel was deposited in the stream channel, which later proved more resistant to erosion than the materials outside the channel, creating this inverted relief.

Meanders are formed when a river channel gradually erodes the outer banks, increasing the curvature of the channel. Eventually the river decides to take a short cut, cutting off a meander, as shown here. This produces what are called oxbow lakes.

Written by: Alfred McEwen  (10 October 2007)

This is a stereo pair with PSP_001336_1560.
 
Acquisition date
23 November 2006

Local Mars time:
15:42

Latitude (centered)
-23.829°

Longitude (East)
326.383°

Spacecraft altitude
267.7 km (167.3 miles)

Original image scale range
26.8 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects ~80 cm across are resolved

Map projected scale
25 cm/pixel and North is up

Map projection
Equirectangular

Emission angle:
16.9°

Phase angle:
54.7°

Solar incidence angle
67°, with the Sun about 23° above the horizon

Solar longitude
139.9°, Northern Summer

For non-map projected images
North azimuth:  97°
Sub-solar azimuth:  38.8°
JPEG
Black and white
map projected  non-map

IRB color
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Merged IRB
map projected

Merged RGB
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RGB color
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JP2
Black and white
map-projected   (1359MB)

IRB color
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JP2 EXTRAS
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map-projected  (759MB)
non-map           (697MB)

IRB color
map projected  (279MB)
non-map           (562MB)

Merged IRB
map projected  (312MB)

Merged RGB
map-projected  (318MB)

RGB color
non map           (546MB)
ANAGLYPHS
Map-projected, reduced-resolution
Full resolution JP2 download
Anaglyph details page

DIGITAL TERRAIN MODEL (DTM)
DTM details page

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
B&W label
Color label
Merged IRB label
Merged RGB label
EDR products
HiView

NB
IRB: infrared-red-blue
RGB: red-green-blue
About color products (PDF)

Black & white is 5 km across; enhanced color about 1 km
For scale, use JPEG/JP2 black & white map-projected images

USAGE POLICY
All of the images produced by HiRISE and accessible on this site are within the public domain: there are no restrictions on their usage by anyone in the public, including news or science organizations. We do ask for a credit line where possible:
NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

POSTSCRIPT
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif., manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The HiRISE camera was built by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corporation and is operated by the University of Arizona.