Looking for Ice
NASA/JPL/UArizona
Looking for Ice
ESP_044698_2245  Science Theme: Impact Processes
One of MRO’s ongoing campaigns is a search for new impact craters. At high latitudes, such craters often expose ice, which appears bright in HiRISE enhanced-color images. This image was targeted to look at a candidate new crater on a lobate apron. Such aprons are often ice-rich, but the crater shows no bright material that would indicate ice.

Why not? The most likely reason is that the crater simply didn’t dig deeply enough. This crater is barely visible with HiRISE, and probably only excavated down to 10 centimeters or so. At this latitude, ice is often much deeper, first appearing tens of centimeters below the surface. Near the poles, colder temperatures cause ice to be shallower, as NASA’s Phoenix mission discovered in 2008.

Written by: Colin Dundas (audio: Tre Gibbs)  (23 March 2016)
 
Acquisition date
08 February 2016

Local Mars time
14:56

Latitude (centered)
43.894°

Longitude (East)
173.755°

Spacecraft altitude
303.0 km (188.3 miles)

Original image scale range
30.4 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects ~91 cm across are resolved

Map projected scale
25 cm/pixel and North is up

Map projection
Equirectangular

Emission angle
3.7°

Phase angle
44.7°

Solar incidence angle
41°, with the Sun about 49° above the horizon

Solar longitude
106.2°, Northern Summer

For non-map projected images
North azimuth:  97°
Sub-solar azimuth:  351.6°
JPEG
Black and white
map projected  non-map

IRB color
map projected  non-map

Merged IRB
map projected

Merged RGB
map projected

RGB color
non-map projected

JP2
Black and white
map-projected   (623MB)

IRB color
map-projected   (353MB)

JP2 EXTRAS
Black and white
map-projected  (271MB)
non-map           (289MB)

IRB color
map projected  (92MB)
non-map           (233MB)

Merged IRB
map projected  (174MB)

Merged RGB
map-projected  (171MB)

RGB color
non map           (229MB)
BONUS
4K (TIFF)

BONUS (MP4)
HiClip mini HD

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
B&W label
Color label
Merged IRB label
Merged RGB label
EDR products
HiView

NB
IRB: infrared-red-blue
RGB: red-green-blue
About color products (PDF)

Black & white is 5 km across; enhanced color about 1 km
For scale, use JPEG/JP2 black & white map-projected images

USAGE POLICY
All of the images produced by HiRISE and accessible on this site are within the public domain: there are no restrictions on their usage by anyone in the public, including news or science organizations. We do ask for a credit line where possible:
NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

POSTSCRIPT
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif., manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The HiRISE camera was built by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corporation and is operated by the University of Arizona.