Fractured Mounds in Elysium Planitia
NASA/JPL/University of Arizona
Fractured Mounds in Elysium Planitia
PSP_003597_1765  Science Theme: Volcanic Processes
Spanish 


WALLPAPER

800  1024  
1152  1280  
1440  1600  
1920  2048  
2560  

HIFLYER

PDF, 11 x 17 in  
This observation shows fractured mounds on the southern edge of Elysium Planitia.

The mounds are typically a few kilometers in diameter and about 200 feet tall. The fractures that crisscross their surfaces are dilational (extensional) in nature, suggesting that the mounds formed by localized uplift (i.e., they were pushed up from below).

The mounds are probably composed of solidified lava. They are contiguous with, and texturally similar to, the flood lavas that blanket much of Elysium Planitia, and, where dilation cracks provide cross-sectional exposure, the uplifted material is rocky.

Patches of mechanically weak and disrupted material overlie the rocky mound material. This is particularly conspicuous in the Northeast corner of the HiRISE image. These patches may be remnants of a layer that was once more continuous but has been extensively eroded. Smooth lava plains fill the low-lying areas between the mounds. They are riddled with sinuous pressure ridges. The entire area is covered by a relatively thin layer of dust and sand.

Written by: W. L. Jaeger   (6 October 2010)

This is a stereo pair with PSP_002542_1765.

Click to share this post on Twitter Click to share this post on Facebook Click to share this post on Google+ Click to share this post on Tumblr



 
Acquisition date
03 May 2007

Local Mars time:
15:35

Latitude (centered)
-3.255°

Longitude (East)
167.902°

Range to target site
290.2 km (181.4 miles)

Original image scale range
29.0 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects ~87 cm across are resolved

Map projected scale
25 cm/pixel and North is up

Map projection
Equirectangular

Emission angle:
22.9°

Phase angle:
33.2°

Solar incidence angle
55°, with the Sun about 35° above the horizon

Solar longitude
231.0°, Northern Autumn

North azimuth:
97°

Sub-solar azimuth:
342.8°
JPEG
Black and white
map projected  non-map

IRB color
map projected  non-map

Merged IRB
map projected

Merged RGB
map projected

RGB color
non-map projected

JP2
Black and white
map-projected   (1125MB)

IRB color
map-projected   (427MB)

JP2 EXTRAS
Black and white
map-projected  (489MB)
non-map           (559MB)

IRB color
map projected  (178MB)
non-map           (410MB)

Merged IRB
map projected  (268MB)

Merged RGB
map-projected  (274MB)

RGB color
non map           (396MB)
ANAGLYPHS
Map-projected, reduced-resolution
Full resolution JP2 download
Anaglyph details page

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
B&W label
Color label
Merged IRB label
Merged RGB label
EDR products
HiView

NB
IRB: infrared-red-blue
RGB: red-green-blue
About color products (PDF)

Black & white is 5 km across; enhanced color about 1 km
For scale, use JPEG/JP2 black & white map-projected images



USAGE POLICY
All of the images produced by HiRISE and accessible on this site are within the public domain: there are no restrictions on their usage by anyone in the public, including news or science organizations. We do ask for a credit line where possible:
NASA/JPL/University of Arizona



Postscript
For information about NASA and agency programs on the Web, visit: http://www.nasa.gov. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif., manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Lockheed Martin Space Systems is the prime contractor for the project and built the spacecraft. The HiRISE camera was built by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corporation and is operated by the University of Arizona. The image data were processed using the U.S. Geological Survey’s ISIS3 software.