Martian Meanders and Scroll-Bars
NASA/JPL/University of Arizona
Martian Meanders and Scroll-Bars
ESP_020673_1750  Science Theme: Fluvial Processes
Spanish 

WALLPAPER

800  1024
1152  1280
1440  1600
1920  2048
2560  2880
2736  4500
4K  8K

HIFLYER

PDF, 11 x 17 in

HISLIDES

PowerPoint
Keynote
PDF
This is a portion of an inverted fluvial channel in the region of Aeolis/Zephyria Plana, at the Martian equator.

Channels become inverted when the sediments filling them become more resistant to erosion than the surrounding material. Here, the most likely process leading to hardening of the channel material is chemical cementation by precipitation of minerals. Once the surrounding material erodes, the channel is left standing as a ridge. The series of curvilinear lineations are ancient scroll-bars, which are features typical of river meanders (bends) in terrestrial fluvial channels.

Scroll-bars are series of ridges that result from the continuous lateral migration of a meander. On Earth, they are more common in mature rivers. The presence of scroll bars suggests that the water flow in this channel may have been sustained for a relatively long time.

Measuring characteristics of these scroll-bars and meanders may help to estimate the amount of water that once flowed in this channel, aiding our understanding of the history of water on Mars.

Written by: Alexandra Lefort  (1 March 2017)

This is a stereo pair with ESP_020528_1750.
twitter  •  facebook  •  google+  •  tumblr
 
Acquisition date
24 December 2010

Local Mars time:
15:30

Latitude (centered)
-5.064°

Longitude (East)
154.915°

Range to target site
292.8 km (183.0 miles)

Original image scale range
29.3 cm/pixel (with 1 x 1 binning) so objects ~88 cm across are resolved

Map projected scale
25 cm/pixel and North is up

Map projection
Equirectangular

Emission angle:
24.5°

Phase angle:
76.9°

Solar incidence angle
52°, with the Sun about 38° above the horizon

Solar longitude
204.3°, Northern Autumn

For non-map projected images
North azimuth:  96°
Sub-solar azimuth:  356.0°
JPEG
Black and white
map projected  non-map

IRB color
map projected  non-map

Merged IRB
map projected

Merged RGB
map projected

RGB color
non-map projected

JP2
Black and white
map-projected   (1676MB)

IRB color
map-projected   (719MB)

JP2 EXTRAS
Black and white
map-projected  (881MB)
non-map           (765MB)

IRB color
map projected  (301MB)
non-map           (583MB)

Merged IRB
map projected  (400MB)

Merged RGB
map-projected  (410MB)

RGB color
non map           (547MB)
ANAGLYPHS
Map-projected, reduced-resolution
Full resolution JP2 download
Anaglyph details page

DIGITAL TERRAIN MODEL (DTM)
DTM details page

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
B&W label
Color label
Merged IRB label
Merged RGB label
EDR products
HiView

NB
IRB: infrared-red-blue
RGB: red-green-blue
About color products (PDF)

Black & white is 5 km across; enhanced color about 1 km
For scale, use JPEG/JP2 black & white map-projected images

USAGE POLICY
All of the images produced by HiRISE and accessible on this site are within the public domain: there are no restrictions on their usage by anyone in the public, including news or science organizations. We do ask for a credit line where possible:
NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

POSTSCRIPT
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif., manages the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. The HiRISE camera was built by Ball Aerospace and Technology Corporation and is operated by the University of Arizona.